Deadly Vaccine Scandal In China Has Residents Fleeing

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China is a country on the brink of erupting into the plumes of catastrophe. Some might say that it already has.

When it was discovered that an unlicensedĀ business has been selling potentially deadly vaccines since 2010, China seemingly lost itself in the downward spiral of chaos; even losing sight of the complete picture. Vaccine safety has always been an issue, no matter how the vaccines are stored.

What’s interesting in the case is that after the arrest of over 300 ChineseĀ residents in connection with the unlicensed business, the resulting mayhem has created a greater need for vaccines. Once again, the vaccine industry uses events which would bury most any other corporation and turns it into lemonade.

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The lemonade started to brew yesterday when Hong Kong announced that it would limit non-resident vaccination. Since the criminal investigation broke, Chinese people have begun fleeing mainland China looking for vaccines in “safe zones.” The China mainland is now said to be overrun with at least $90 million in fraudulent vaccines. According to Reuters, Hong Kong’s imposed limit will give priority of “safe vaccines” to local children.

“The government’s policy is to accord priority to local children,” Hong Kong’s Assistant Director of Health for Family and Elderly Health Services, Teresa Li, said in a statement.

“We will closely monitor the utilization of services by (non-resident children) and may adjust the quota or withhold new case bookings.”

As so far, the criminal findings in the unlicensed vaccine case come down to improper storage. The vaccines were not properly refrigerated. This is a rather important aspect of any food or medicine. It is criminal not to act in compliance. But the truth is, vaccine safety is often a risky business even for properly stored vaccine products.

The mayhem, however, has provided vaccines with a more urgent market. Residents are crossing borders to obtain vaccines and even if that is under the premise of seeking safe concoctions, it remains an event which is creating a mass need. In other words, vaccines are exploding in popularity in China. A major vaccine criminal act is uncovered, and now vaccines are more sought after than ever? What’s more interesting, as TruthKings reported back on March 22nd, is that the government was an active participant in the matter.

Apparently China lied about this issue for a year. According to USAToday.tv, Chinese authorities have known about the matter since last April. To worsen the situation, the 47-year-old pharmacist who has been detained was convicted of the same offense in 2009 but received a suspended sentence.

In essence, the Chinese government is responsible for flooding the market with “bad vaccines” and now vaccines are so sought after, that Chinese residents are crossing the seas to obtain them. This is the perfect scenario for pharmaceutical companies. The market for their product in China couldn’t be higher. And it is all built from a ghastly event involving underground criminals and the Chinese government.

The vaccines were for flu, chicken pox, hepatitis A, meningitis, and rabies. The 24 provinces and cities affected were Anhui, Beijing, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hebei, Henan, Heilongjiang, Hubei, Jilin, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Chongqing, Zhejiang, Sichuan, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Shandong, Hunan, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia and Xinjiang. This is yet another scenario that people need to consider when it comes to vaccines.

If you believe that a few pockets of Chinese criminals are an isolated vaccine mafia, you would be incorrect. Pharmaceutical companies have largely avoided vaccine injury claims due to existing under United States government protection. They simply can’t be litigated against for criminal activity. Watchdog group, Public Citizen, recently uncovered the deep extent of this fraud. In the end, pharmaceutical companies will laugh all the way to the bank as they sweep into the Chinese mainland and supply them with “good vaccines.” People should be careful what they beg for.

 

 

 


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