Calvin College In Michigan, 1 Case Of Vaccinated Mumps, Suspends All Unvaccinated Students

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The mumps vaccination failure tour now finds itself at a liberal arts private university,  Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. And, they are blaming the unvaccinated.

One vaccinated student has come down with mumps and that has now disrupted 16 unvaccinated students at the college. Those students have now been suspended from all school related activities, including graduation and finals, unless they receive the highly ineffective vaccination, regardless of their medical or religious exemption. This will continue for the next 26 days unless another vaccinated case of mumps is revealed.

For students who choose to not get the vaccination, they are recommended to stay off campus and not participate in any campus activities.  With the end of the semester right around the corner, school officials say they will allow students who don’t have the mumps vaccine to take their finals. They will have to do so in an isolated area away from other students.

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Mumps is highly contagious, but is preventable with a vaccine.  It is spread through saliva and can be transmitted by coughing, sneezing, sharing drinks or utensils or even talking with an infected person.  Mumps also causes puffy cheeks.  Sufferers also get a fever, headache and muscle aches.

As the rampant reports of  MMR vaccination failure continue, the mumps portion continues to fail at the college level at an alarming rate this year. The high-profile Harvard epidemic has run through the 100% “well-vaccinated” population at that school at an epidemic level, causing a well know infectious disease specialist to acknowledge that the vaccine offers very little protection versus any type of direct contact with the virus.

Dr. Amesh Adalja, a highly respected infectious-disease specialist, states mumps vaccination may be sufficient to protect vaccinated individuals from low-level exposure to the virus. However, if one is exposed to high levels of the virus, vaccination may not be enough. 

 

 

 

 


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